Questions on Responsive WordPress Theme Design

I’ve been giving a lot of thought to Responsive Web Design lately and how it affects — and ought to affect — WordPress Theme Design. Mark Boulton’s latest article A Richer Canvas has me thinking about it even more. Designing from the content out is something I always strive to do. I think all good designers should strive for it. That said, Designing WordPress Themes is an interesting challenge for someone that believes in designing from the content out. It becomes even more interesting when you start creating a responsive layout that adapts to different screen sizes without knowing what content will fill that space. But it’s not exactly a problem. It’s just … interesting. :)

What do you think? Have you started to bring Responsive layouts into your WordPress Themes? How do you approach good design without content? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Bonus: If you’re looking for some examples of Responsive Web Design in WordPress Themes check out Sara Cannon and Dan Gavin’s Responsive Twenty Ten, Theme Foundry and Jon Hick’s gorgeous Shelf, and our very own — soon-to-be-released on the WP.org theme directory — Duster.

What’s In a Name: Duster

A lot of people have been asking where the name for the Duster theme came from. I love naming themes (it’s probably something that warrants a post of it’s own in the future) so I’m glad to share the backstory. We started work on Duster during a team meetup in Arizona — notorious land of cowboys and shoot ‘em ups. We wanted something that reflected that same tough cowboy aesthetic and so, Duster. Well, actually, that’s only half true. It’s also the name of this really lovely pink flower you can find in Arizona. It’s really quite beautiful. :)