Sass in underscores

Sass comes to _s

I’m pleased to announce that you can now get Sass rolled into _s by simply checking the box on Underscores.me. The community has driven this change through pull requests and forks.

It’s taken a little while, but we wanted to do it right. As with the rest of Underscores, we wanted to keep it as simple as possible, offering any extra scripting with a checkbox option rather than imposing it on all developers. Not everyone compiles or uses Sass the same, so _s shouldn’t force anyone to follow one path or another. In this sense, the Sass provided takes a pure approach, not requiring Compass or any other scripts.

Worth noting along with this addition is that the Github version of _s is now purely for development. We strongly recommend only using Underscores.me to download _s, going forward.

Just like with _s itself, the Sass it uses will probably change and evolve with time. What is in place now is a structure, a starting point. Any issues, or requests can be posted on Github, and you can even roll your own using a fork. Just like _s is your theme’s starting point, you can take the Sass in any direction you want.

I hope you are excited as I am to see Sass in _s! I’d like to thank the following people – without them this would not have been possible. As this was a Github project, here are their Github usernames: @gregrickaby @bradp @hugobaeta @obenland @sabreuse @MichaelArestad @jacklenox and myself. I look forward to seeing what things people build and where they take Sass in _s.

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Granting Commit Access to Underscores

With Underscores’ growing popularity and continuing maturation as an open source project, we decided to take the next step and open up commit access to contributors outside of Automattic. Please join me in congratulating Philip Arthur Moore on becoming the first external committer to an Automattic project on GitHub.

Philip has been a fairly easy choice as we obviously know him well here at Automattic. He was with us for over three years and a driving factor in everything theme related during his time with us. But more importantly, he continues to care about Underscores and contribute in discussions and patches, and we know about his theme development skills and passion for world class themes.

We’re much more conservative with our Underscores goals and dreams than most people wanting to contribute, so it is important to us that committers share these values and understand where we see the project headed. We have no doubt that that is the case with Philip, who helped shaping Underscores from the day it started. Andrew Nacin recently published a post about how the WordPress project chooses committers, and while WordPress and Underscores are vastly different open source projects, there is still a lot to take away from it—especially around the qualities of a great contributor—that also applies to this project.

Underscores just recently celebrated its second birthday. It has become an integral part of many projects, not only at Automattic, but for theme developers all over the world. So we’re exited to have Philip back in a leading role and continue this journey with us!

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Don’t Update Your Theme (From _s)

I recently attended Steve Zehngut’s session on Underscores at WordCamp Los Angeles, where I was surprised to learn that a lot of developers are unsure how to update their themes with the changes we make on _s.

Version-less _s

For that we decided to make _s version-less, to prevent the feeling you need to update your _s-based themes with these constant changes. With no real roadmap, previously we bumped the version number arbitrarily whenever we felt like it, with a big enough change. Continue reading