A Set of Theme User Experience Requirements

This year, we’ve focused heavily on improving people’s experience using themes on WordPress.com. We’ve dug into defining the most common and tricky issues for people using themes through research, user testing, and iteration.

We still have a long way to go toward substantially improving people’s WordPress theme experience. To that end, we’re introducing a new set of requirements for all themes on WordPress.com to follow, geared toward making themes easier for people to set up and use. We call it the TUX List.

It features best practices like this:

  • Keep widget names descriptive of their location, ie. Sidebar, Footer, etc. Reason: Users can more easily find them and know what area they refer to.
  • Widget IDs should take the format of sidebar-1, sidebar-2, etc.

Reason: Consistency across themes means that a user can switch themes and not have to reassign their widgets to the theme’s widget locations. It also allows for easier readability in code.

We wanted to share it with the community, since incorporating these best practices into your themes on WordPress.org and elsewhere means anyone using them will have an easier time getting to what they really want to do: publish their site. Nothing on the list should restrict your creativity when it comes to designs.

Give it a read and let us know if you have any questions or ideas on how to make it better. Making themes easier is a job for everyone. Happy theming!

Introducing Components: A Toolbox for WordPress Theme Development

Meet Components, a starter-theme generator to speed up WordPress theme development.

We love a good starter theme. Since launching Toolbox and its popular successor, Underscores, we’ve always reached for a starter theme when building our next, awesome WordPress theme to get us off on the right foot. With Underscores, we always say it gives you a 1,000-hour start. We get excited when we see someone fork Underscores and make it their own, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that we’re obsessed with evolving what we think of as a starter theme.

Continuing that journey, we’re pleased to announce Components. Think of it as a toolbox for taking your themes where you want them to go, faster. Forked from Underscores, Components gives you a solid base to work from – but it also takes the starter theme to the next level, offering a choice between five different theme types. Each one adds the code needed for starting a certain type of theme. You can select from:

The Classic Blog

  • A two-column layout
  • A sidebar with widgets
  • Navigation in the header
  • A fixed maximum width of 1120px in your style.css file

The Modern Blog

  • A single-column layout
  • A sliding panel for navigation, social menu, and also widgets
  • A large featured image with full-width script

Portfolio

  • A portfolio post type, courtesy of Jetpack, added to all the necessary files
  • A grid portfolio view
  • A single column blog template
  • A sliding panel for navigation, social menu, and also widgets
  • A large featured image with full-width script

Magazine

  • A front page template with featured images in grid a layout, plus a two-column blog
  • Layout with excerpts
  • A two-column layout
  • A sidebar with widgets
  • Navigation in the header
  • A fixed maximum width of 1120px in your style.css file

Business

  • A front-page template with a custom header, testimonials section, and  page content area
  • A custom testimonial post type turned on, courtesy of Jetpack
  • A two-column layout
  • A sidebar with widgets
  • Navigation in the header
  • A fixed maximum width of 1120px in your style.css file

Why Components?

So why the different approach with Components? Three main things inspired this direction: the community behind Underscores, the people who use our themes every day, and the web design and development community.

While maintaining and improving Underscores, we always see great pull requests from the community that we turn away because the contributions end up being too specific for a normal starter theme. Many of those additions would have been perfect in most themes. Now, some of them have a home in a project that zeroes in on a certain kind of user with each theme it builds. Speaking of users, we know from launching hundreds of themes on WordPress.com that themes are one of the most challenging areas of WordPress for people to understand. They need more themes that “just work,” and we hope Components will help achieve that. Lastly, the web community has embraced building systems, methodically created with the pieces that make up a site. Even some popular libraries have taken this approach. We see Components as the first step to allowing you to make a starter theme that’s just right for your project.

We’re very excited to see what the community brings to the project and are looking forward to evolving Components with your help. Right now, we’re in the early stages of our vision and execution for Components, so expect both repositories that power this project, theme-components and components.underscores.me to evolve quickly and constantly.

Fork or download Components on GitHub or generate your own custom starter theme at components.underscores.me and have fun making awesome new WordPress themes!

The ThemeShaper JavaScript Theme Tutorial

Dive into the brave new world of JavaScript WordPress theming, looking at best practices and pitfalls along the way.

Introduction

WordPress theming hasn’t changed very much over the past few years. It’s certainly become more refined, and projects such as Underscores (_s) have helped promote best practices and robust standards. That said, we can still go as far back as Kubrick and find plenty of common ground with the most recent WordPress themes.

This isn’t a bad thing, and it’s probably one of the reasons WordPress is so popular and so many people have been able to get involved in theming. But the web has changed substantially since WordPress welcomed its first default theme in 2006. More than half the web’s users now access it from mobile devices. We have HTML5, and with it a whole host of browser APIs that didn’t exist in 2006. These advances have helped a whole new ecosystem of JavaScript-based web apps blossom.

Some aspects of this ecosystem have found their way into WordPress themes. Most of us have probably seen our fair share of jQuery-enabled carousels. We have JavaScript-enhanced tiled galleries and lightboxes available through plugins like Jetpack. Yet very few of us would consider building a theme entirely in JavaScript. The thought may even send shivers down many of our spines.

Building a WordPress theme with JavaScript might be considered lunacy by some, who may wonder why you’d want to attempt such a thing. Others may have questions about SEO, performance, accessibility, plugin compatibility, among a myriad of issues. There are definitely challenges to building a theme with JavaScript, and before reading any further you should know that this is still an experimental area of WordPress theme development.

But, and this is a big “but,” a JavaScript-based approach to theme-building opens up a wonderful world of new possibilities to the curious developer, including:

  • Storing and pre-fetching content using the browser’s Web Storage API to allow server-less, seamless transitions — using the browser’s History API — between posts and pages.
  • Animations within themes, for more natural and intuitive interactions.
  • The ability to create entirely offline experiences using all new Service Workers.

Along with these exciting improvements, the WordPress REST API is being integrated into Core. The REST API makes it much easier for us to build themes with JavaScript. There is no better time to start getting familiar with how the WordPress ecosystem is changing.

The Series

In this five-part tutorial, we’ll expose you to the brave new world that WordPress theme development might inhabit in the coming years. While the best practices for building a theme in this way are still to be established, we’ll do our very best to guide you into the secret garden of the future.

Stay tuned for:

  1. JavaScript, jQuery and the web landscape today
  2. Introducing REST APIs
  3. Challenges in JavaScript-Based Theming
  4. Bringing React into our theme
  5. Et voila, a JavaScript WordPress theme that uses the WordPress REST API